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5 things you missed at Strata + Hadoop World

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Content Marketing Manager, Data Science, IBM Analytics, IBM

Strata + Hadoop World in San Jose, California, brought together the best and brightest minds from the big data community. Data scientists, data engineers, developers, IT professionals, vendors and more came together to collaborate on how to succeed in a data-driven world. For those of you who weren’t able to attend, what do you need to know? Here are five noteworthy happenings.

1. Happy birthday to Hadoop

Apache Hadoop and its community turns 10 years old in 2016, and the milestone was marked with an official birthday celebration at Strata + Hadoop World. Supporting the birthday celebration, ODPi announced its first runtime specification and test suite to help simplify and expedite development of data-driven applications. ODPi’s mission is to simplify and standardize the growing Hadoop ecosystem, so that customers can get more from their Hadoop investments and deployments.

Big Data is the key to enterprises welcoming the cognitive era,” said Rob Thomas, vice president of product development, IBM Analytics. “And there’s a need across the board for advancements in the Hadoop ecosystem to ensure companies can get the most out of their deployments in the most efficient ways possible. With the ODPi Runtime Specification, developers can write their application once and run it across a variety of distributions—ensuring more efficient applications that can generate the insights necessary for business change.”

2. Spark takes analytics to the next level

Apache Spark took a front and center role at this year’s conference. A growing number of companies showcased the power and value of Spark through sessions, booth presentations, demonstrations and more. However, don’t discount the value of Hadoop. While Spark has emerged as a powerful tool for fast and agile data analysis, Hadoop is still relevant for many use cases around augmenting data warehouse environments and more.

http://www.ibmbigdatahub.com/sites/default/files/bl_pic_1.jpgSteven Sit, director of product management for Hadoop and Spark at IBM, shares in a video interview with theCUBE how companies wanting to take big data to the next stage need something that is fast. And it needs to allow more than just an elite few to work seamlessly together—which is where Spark comes in.

In addition, plenty of exciting advancements in Spark are expected to take place over the course of next year. Holden Karau, software development engineer at IBM, discusses some of these enhancements in a video interview with theCUBE, starting with the 2016 launch of Spark 2.0. One of Spark 2.0’s exciting capabilities allows people to mix functional and relational queries, enabling traditional business analysts to work with Spark easily versus relying on a data engineer or someone with deeper technical expertise to execute everything. 

And IBM announced a new IBM z/OS platform for Apache Spark. It allows data scientists and developers to access data that may reside in mainframe systems without needing additional mainframe skills, and enables them to bring analytics to where the data resides. This capability indicates further Spark’s versatility and flexibility to be used across a variety of use cases and environments. Be sure to also check out some of the other Spark announcements made at Strata + Hadoop World.

http://www.ibmbigdatahub.com/sites/default/files/bl_pic_2.jpg3. Embrace the cloud to enable open innovation

A steady rise in innovation is happening in open communities—Hadoop, Spark and beyond. Who knows what’s next? Cloud computing is becoming the medium to enhance the benefits of open source and to take care of the tasks that were once burdensome and required heavy lifting. Walking throughout the EXPO and peeking into various sessions at the conference, clearly much growth is occurring in the cloud and organizations are investing in the cloud. Companies are realizing the need to embrace cloud-based solutions that allow for rapid experimentation, accelerated innovation and faster time to insight than ever before. Check out the keynote from Adam Kocoloski, CTO of analytics platform services at IBM, in which he discusses the need for all organizations to be open by design and open for data. 

4. Partner with data and analytics success

http://www.ibmbigdatahub.com/sites/default/files/bl_pic_3.jpgThe growing analytics ecosystem was a key theme at Strata + Hadoop World in San Jose. Companies and professionals are seeing that there isn’t a single vendor or investor that can bring together all the bits and pieces to help a business capitalize on data and analytics. Learn more about the value of partnerships and how they are driving innovation in the analytics space from Joel Horwitz, director of strategy and business development at IBM in an interview with theCUBE.

WANDisco and IBM offer another example that comes to mind. They are partnering to provide companies insight no matter where their data resides. See Ritika Gunnar, vice president, data and analytics at IBM, and David Richards, CEO at WANDisco, discuss in an interview with theCube the goal to allow companies to generate immediate insights, transform their business models and provide the tooling and skills necessary to activate data, no matter where it resides. 

For companies looking to join in on successes such as the WANDisco and IBM partnership, IBM also announced Open Analytics Ecosystem, a pilot open analytics ecosystem program. It offers a first-of-its-kind open partnership program to build relationships within the open analytics community directly with the business leaders, applications makers and technology experts to decrease the time it takes for them to achieve success.

http://www.ibmbigdatahub.com/sites/default/files/bl_pic_4.jpg5. Prepare for a robot apocalypse

OK, just kidding about this one. But if you attended Strata + Hadoop World in San Jose, you likely heard everyone talking about Marvin, a robot powered by Spark. EXPO attendees were given a chance to compete against Marvin by playing rock, paper, scissors. Marvin and Spark proved to be a dominant force, winning the majority of the games by using a machine learning algorithm that predicts what a human’s next move will be. If you didn’t get a chance to see Marvin in person, learn more about how the robot was programmed, and follow Marvin on Twitter @marvinwinsagain

Still feel like you missed out on Strata + Hadoop World 2016? Read more about what happened in San Jose in a recap blog by James Kobielus. Next up is Strata + Hadoop World in London, UK, 31 May–3 June 2016. Be sure to register today.